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October 23, 2014
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Comments Off on After the Freeze: UC Privatization Since 2012

After the Freeze: UC Privatization Since 2012

At one of the first walkout planning meetings I attended that fall, people were talking about something called the “Meister report,” which I later learned was named after its author, UC Santa Cruz Professor Bob Meister. The Report talked about how UC administrators were able to take out low-interest construction bonds because they essentially pledged to Moody’s and other rating agencies that they would raise student tuition if necessary to pay back the bonds. Continue reading

October 10, 2014
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Video of “The Operation of the Machine”

Streaming video of the Berkeley Faculty Association Presentation: “The Operation of the Machine: U.C. Then and Now” A Teach-in on the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the Free Speech Movement” (UC Berkeley, October 1, 2014) is now available: Prof. … Continue reading

May 14, 2013
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Comments Off on BFA Board opposes the amendment to UC Berkeley’s 2020 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP), to allow the construction of a $15 million Aquatics Center

BFA Board opposes the amendment to UC Berkeley’s 2020 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP), to allow the construction of a $15 million Aquatics Center

At the UC Regents meeting in Sacramento on May 15, 2013, the Regents will be asked to approve an amendment to UC Berkeley’s 2020 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP), to allow the construction of a $15 million Aquatics Center on … Continue reading

April 10, 2013
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Comments Off on BFA Concerns about Intercollegiate Athletics

BFA Concerns about Intercollegiate Athletics

BFA letter to the Academic Senate concerning a list of issues related to Intercollegiate Athletics. We ask the present Senate leadership to do what we resolved in 2009: establish a Senate Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics. We urge the Senate to encourage responsible discussion on the Environmental Impact Report for the proposed Aquatic Center and plans to seek approval at the May meeting of the UC Regents. Continue reading

January 11, 2013
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Comments Off on How Much Would It Cost to Restore California’s Public Higher Ed (January 2013 update)?

How Much Would It Cost to Restore California’s Public Higher Ed (January 2013 update)?

Raising revenue has become such a taboo subject in California politics, but restoring quality public higher education in California can be done. For the median California tax return (individual or joint), restoring the entire system while rolling back student fees … Continue reading

November 17, 2010
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Meister’s Open Letter to Yudof on Tuition Increase

Open Letter from CUCFA President Meister to UC President Yudof on This Year’s Tuition Increase to UC President Mark Yudof

So, you’re raising tuition again—reluctantly, and because you feel you have no choice, but, still, you’re doing it. You raised it last year by an amount that would largely offset what the state had cut from UC’s appropriation during the financial crisis. And this year you are raising it despite the fact that the state has restored half that dollar amount, thanks largely to student protests. I’ll pass over the fact that you’re not using funds from this year’s tuition increase to restore even half of last year’s instructional cuts on UC campuses. Instead, you encourage students to believe that two thirds of their new tuition will help avoid instructional cuts that would otherwise have occurred in some imagined future. It is evident to all, however, that UC’s instructional cost (cost per credit hour) is going down so that UC can channel funds into areas where costs are almost certain to go up—for example new construction projects that are unlikely to pay for themselves or research activities that will need to be subsidized (perhaps increasingly) by enrollment-generated funds. It seems that instruction is one of the few areas where UC administrators know how to economize, and that instructional fees are the only revenue stream that UC is confident of being able to increase, perhaps indefinitely.[1] Continue reading